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Follow Up On Nader Anise Free Phone Call

Here's the announcement about the Nader Anise FREE teleseminar scheduled for November 15:

Hi there,

Happy Veterans Day.

This year's FRE*E "Lawyer Appreciation" teleseminar is all about making it BIG as a lawyerpreneur.

My guest is a high-profile, A-list attorney. He's also the "2007 Lawyerpreneur of the Year."

He's been in the news A LOT lately.

Want to know who it is -- and what he will talk about?

All the details are at www.LawyerAppreciation.com Please go there now.

Here's a hint: a big part of what he and I will talk about is how to build a 7-figure law practice.

If you don't have such lofty ambitions, well, then you will still get some real gems about building a sizeable 6-figure a year income.

If you are a true lawyerpreneur and aren't offended by making huge sums of mone*y, then head on over to www.LawyerAppreciation.com for the nitty-gritty details. You'll be glad you did.


Remember, it's a FRE*E teleseminar. Don't wait... this exciting call is only a few days away!

Posted by Carolyn Elefant on November 11, 2007 at 07:51 AM in Announcements | Permalink

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Comments

It’s amazing how these comments take on a life of their own. Scott, I’m sorry to say, but the more comments you post, the more insecure you sound. I’m especially struck by the “treat everyone with dignity” and the “gain the respect of… (your) peers” parts of your success strategy, when you’re basically implying that Michael can’t read. Is that your way of treating him with dignity or is it your attempt to gain his respect? You might want to reconsider this success strategy of yours, or at the very least, follow your own advice.

Posted by: Steve Dimian | Nov 28, 2007 7:09:35 PM

Dear Carolyn,

You provide an open forum for solos to exchange ideas and I really appreciate that. I responded to what Scott wrote because A) I have seen firsthand how powerful Nader's strategies are and that they work (apparently, I'm not the only one who thinks so, just read the other comments on there) and B) what Scott wrote doesn't really make much sense and is hard to believe. Curiosity is one thing, but to jump through hoops to learn about something he admittedly has no interest in (his supposed "colleague" is the one who needs the advice) is another. I'm sorry, I just don't buy it.

Just as he was expressing his opinion, so was I. I believe that is what the comment section is all about. While I may have had a sarcastic tone, I did not make a personal attack on him. I was just reacting to his comments.

Believe me, I'm not trying to make anyone a Nader "convert." I have no personal interest in doing so. But, at the very least, Nader doesn't deserve to be disparaged by someone who knows nothing about him when he has done so much good for a lot of solos.

Sincerely,
Michael

Posted by: Michael Alexander | Nov 28, 2007 3:43:29 PM

Michael,

Doing everything Nader says is not going to improve your reading skills. Read again, slowly, and perhaps you will see where you've gone astray.

I'm going to offer you my strategy for success. It's simple, yet difficult to achieve. Do exceptional work for your clients. Treat them very, very well. Be honest and treat everyone with dignity. Gain the respect of judges, peers and clients. Grow your practice organically.

Like Nader's way, it's not for everyone.

Posted by: scott greenfield | Nov 28, 2007 1:02:02 PM

Scott,

I’m not a shrink or anything, but it sure sounds like you’re in denial. You made the time to read Carolyn’s post about Nader’s (marketing) seminar and then you logged on to his (marketing) website to register for the call. And on the day of the seminar you called in to listen to Nader’s interview with John Lauro (on marketing). But according to you, you WEREN’T interested in marketing; you were just curious “what the scheme was all about.” OK, whatever you say.

Personally, if I had zero interest in basket weaving (which happens to be the case), you couldn’t get me even close a basket weaving seminar even if the “Tiger Woods of basket weaving” (if there even is such a thing) were holding a personal clinic and I was getting paid in cash to attend. I will simply not exert that kind of energy in a topic I am uninterested in no matter how “curious” I am.

By the way, I’m not saying Nader’s strategies are for everyone. They’re not. They’re mainly for those lawyers who want to a make a great deal of money using ethical practices and make no apologies about it.

Just my two cents.

Posted by: Michael Alexander | Nov 27, 2007 5:28:40 PM

Sorry, but I never came back to check comments until today, when I found my comment prominently displayed in Nader's ezine.

One of the most important things one can do as an attorney is avoid unwarranted assumptions. The comments assume, as does Nader's email, that I joined his conference call because I wanted to build my practice. In fact, I joined because Carolyn told me about it due to one of my posts and, as a blawger, I was curious what the scheme was all about.

You should be cautious when jumping to conclusions. As should Nader, who's misapprehension of my purpose and imputation of certain "attributes" to me demonstrated that he is no better at reaching spurious conclusions than anyone else.

So drink the cool-aid if you want, but I'll pass. I wish all of you the best of luck in building the practices of your dreams. I am fortunate in that I have already done so.

Posted by: scott greenfield | Nov 27, 2007 3:11:18 PM

Scott: I agree w/the other positive comments. You bailed too early. Nader's going to post the call on his website and you should download and listen to it while you're driving. I've taken my practice to a 7 figure book of biz simply by using Nader's techniques and I still learned a couple new ideas in that call. Mike's (one of the "Honorable Mentions" personal endorsement and explanation of how he used the "secret speech" finally gave me the confidence to try it (up until now, I've heard Nader discuss it, but couldn't bring myself to try it because it felt too pushy; I just used it on a new client 2 minutes ago, with the language suggested by Mike and it went perfectly well). So, listen to the ENTIRE interview (one of the best "revelations" comes from Lauro's answer to the last listener question) and keep an open mind.

Posted by: Jeff Lerman | Nov 20, 2007 11:41:45 AM

You missed the most important part of the call, Scott, if you gave up after only 15 minutes. John Lauro, I assume for scheduling reasons, didn't begin until about the 30 minute mark and Nader allowed a couple of other attorneys - myself included - to share our experiences.

Let me be totally fair - Nader is very enthusiastic and if he has a chance to thank someone for participating, he'll do so zealously. Some might take this as "hyperbolic" and that's a matter of opinion. But the truth is that those who don't mind excessive zeal, or even thrive on it, can take the specific techniques that Nader teaches and do very well with them, in their own style, no hyperbole needed.

John Lauro was an excellent example of that. He's a consummate professional (and white-collar crime defense lawyer) who doesn't come across as "self-promoting" in the way you objected to. He described how he was able to parlay his excellent reputation into a referral stream from some of the most respected firms in the city he's based in. And he does so in a dignified manner worthy of the profession. What's wrong with that?

Scott, if you are practicing law, you're motivated at least in part by the desire to help people. If no one knows who you are or what you can do for them, how can you help them? There are a lot of different ways to get the word out about what you can do for your clients. Some of them - like "pit-bull ads" and the like - are sleazy. But educating the public about what you do in a professional, dignified, and ethical way pushes the profession forward.

I think that Nader offers the tools to do that. (Nader's tools can also be used improperly, but I don't think he supports that in any way.) Many lawyers use them in the way they were intended and it has been a boon for themselves and for the clients who might not otherwise have known about them.

I'm sorry to hear that you missed out on the most important part of the call. I know that Nader's style may not be for everyone, but there's no reason you can't learn from those who have used his techniques to great success - especially when he gives so much information away for free.

Posted by: Mike Wasylik | Nov 19, 2007 10:50:51 AM

I was on the call and thought Nader was great (as usual), and Mr. Lauro shared some valuable insights on how to attract publicity and deal with the media. There were two other lawyers who also spoke about their practices and keys to their success. Great stuff.

As a student of marketing and huge fan of Nader's, I can tell you from experience, his strategies WORK (his "secret" speech almost never fails). To be honest, I am kind of glad not every lawyer out there has discovered Nader's genius (though I'm sure it's only a matter of time). The naysayers can keep struggling and barely making a living, while lawyerpreneurs like me have discovered the key to success.

Posted by: Steven Dimian | Nov 18, 2007 5:23:59 PM

I was on the call and thought Nader was great (as usual), and Mr. Lauro shared some valuable insights on how to attract publicity and deal with the media. There were two other lawyers who also spoke about their practices and keys to their success. Great stuff.

As a student of marketing and huge fan of Nader's, I can tell you from experience, his strategies WORK (his "secret" speech almost never fails).

To be honest, I am kind of glad not every lawyer out there has discovered Nader's genius (though I'm sure it's only a matter of time). The naysayers can keep struggling and barely making a living, while lawyerpreneurs like me have discovered the key to success.

Posted by: | Nov 17, 2007 8:50:56 PM

I tried, Carolyn. I really did. I sat on the conference call for about 15 minutes before I had to get off.

At first, it was the overt pandering with the hyperbolic "thank yous" that got me. But then it was the flagrant hype of self-promotion.

The good news was that there was directed toward civil practice rather than criminal, but if I had to do this to stay afloat, I would rather flip burgers. It's just not the way I would be willing to live my life.

So after 15 minutes, I quietly hung up the phone and took a shower. I'm glad that I spent those 15 minutes on the phone, though, because I needed to know what I was missing.

Posted by: scott greenfield | Nov 16, 2007 7:30:39 AM

I'd encourage anyone considering Nader's teleseminar to do so. I first met him when we worked together back when I was a Practice Management Advisor with The Florida Bar's Law Office Management Assistance Service. It was my pleasure then and it is my pleasure now to recommend Nader's services.

RJON ROBINS
Founder, How To Make It Rain

Posted by: RJON@HowToMakeItRain.com | Nov 12, 2007 5:26:23 AM

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